Program and Agenda

Abstract

HIERARCHICAL ANALYSIS OF BREEDING BIRD SURVEY DATA FROM ROADSIDE AND REMOTE AREAS TO ESTIMATE POPULATION TRENDS IN ALASKA

Arctic and boreal regions are experiencing some of the most rapid ecological changes globally in response to climate warming. These biomes host substantial populations of breeding birds, many of which are largely restricted to northern regions. Remoteness of most of these areas, however, renders the populations difficult and expensive to monitor. The Boreal Partners in Flight working group has made a concerted effort during the past two decades to consistently survey a series of North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) routes along the geographically-limited road system in Alaska. To complement this road-based effort, beginning in 2003 Boreal Partners in Flight also implemented the Alaska Landbird Monitoring Survey (ALMS), which is designed to monitor breeding birds across a stratified random sample of mini-grids in remote areas. The standardized point-transect protocol combines distance sampling and time-removal modeling in a unified framework to adjust counts for detection probability. Here we compare decadal trend estimates derived from the roadside BBS and off-road ALMS programs in a Bayesian hierarchical analysis to (1) evaluate concordance of the trend estimates for an array of species and (2) assess the feasibility and potential benefits of deriving composite estimates to meet regional monitoring goals.

Authors

Handel, C. M., USGS Alaska Science Center, USA, cmhandel@usgs.gov

Sauer, J. R., USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, USA, jrsauer@usgs.gov

Amundson, C. L., USGS Alaska Science Center, USA, camundson@usgs.gov

Matsuoka, S. M., U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, USA, steve_matsuoka@fws.gov

Details

Oral presentation

Session #:S13
Date: 9/26/2014
Time: 14:30
Location: Emerald Mountain - Bible Point

Presentation is given by student: No