Program and Agenda

Other Special Events

Ornithologists in the Military: a Tribute

Do you realize how many professional ornithologists have served in the military through the eras of World War I, World War II, Korea, Vietnam, and Iraq/Afghanistan? Come see a special tribute that has been masterfully produced by Dr. David Manuwal. Watch the website for final scheduling information!

All-out Ostrich Uproar 5K Race

Cost: $20.00
Registration: Pre-Registration recommended and required by September 1st to receive a race T-shirt. If you have already registered, please log in with the credentials you were sent in your registration confirmation email and add the ticketed events to your registration.
Date: Thursday 9/25/2014
Time: 7:00 – 8:30am
Location: YMCA grounds

The 28th running of AOU's traditional 5K (3.1 miles) fun race will take place early morning, Thursday, September 25, before morning talks and with some time for participants to snag breakfast afterwards. The course will wind in and around the YMCA grounds (located at ~8,010 ft/2,440 m of elevation) on paved and unpaved roads with some short stretches on trails to keep you hopping.  The course winds through the forest in places and soaring views of the Rockies promise to make this an Uproar participants will not soon forget. Water will be available on the course. The $20 race participation fee benefits student scholarships and includes a t-shirt and eligibility for ostrich-egg prizes. For additional details, please contact Kate Huyvaert (kate.huyvaert@colostate.edu). 

From Billions to None: The Passenger Pigeon's Flight to Extinction

A showing of this one-hour documentary is planned as part of the symposium “A Century Later: Lessons from the Extinction of the Passenger Pigeon” on Saturday, 27 September, 12:30-1:30 in the Reusch Auditorium. We will schedule two additional showings, also in the Reusch Auditorium, so that as many attendees as are interested can attend: Wednesday evening (movie night) 9:00-10:30 pm, and Friday noon 12:30-1:30.

On September 1, 1914, the last known passenger pigeon in existence died in the Cincinnati Zoo. Martha, named after Martha Washington, was the last of her kind, an amazingly abundant species that went from billions that darkened the entire sky - to none - in a matter of decades. What happened to the passenger pigeon? You could say we happened. From Billions to None: The Passenger Pigeon's Flight to Extinction follows naturalist and author Joel Greenberg on a quest to reveal the incredible story of how the most abundant bird species in North America became extinct by human hands in a geologic heartbeat. 

Planned for a fall 2014 broadcast on public television, this one-hour documentary retells the remarkable tale of the passenger pigeon and explores its striking relevance to conservation challenges today. Interweaving rare archival material, computer animation that brings the flocks of billions to life, stunning nature footage and aerial cinematography, the film recreates the awe-inspiring reality of these birds, and presents passionate scientists, artists, teachers and young people who reveal why, 100 years later, it's important to remember the event - and act.

You can watch the latest video trailer at https://vimeo.com/91863820 and check out the website at:  e-int.com/billionstonone

Ornithological Adventures: A short film from Equatorial Guinea

This past November, three young ornithologists set out on a 10-day expedition to Equatorial Guinea, a little-known but ornithologically rich country in West Central Africa. Equatorial Guinea is a unique case: it is tiny, Spanish-speaking and brings in enormous revenues generated from offshore oil reserves, making it the richest country per capita in Africa.  The country is developing at a furious pace, with new four-lane highways suddenly crisscrossing formerly inaccessible areas.  In this fast-paced documentary, director Mo Twine captures the adventures of these three ornithologists as they attempt to establish a precedent for ornithology in a remote corner of Africa.  

Stay tuned to the website for information on when and where to view this 3-min video. For questions about the film, please contact Dr. Luke Powell at luke.l.powell@gmail.com.